2014-03-12

That Duke Student

Territory this well-tread need not suffer my additional commentary. Sometimes the best I can do is point to good thoughts from other corners of the internet.

If you want the soundbite edition, have a look at this clip from her interview with Piers Morgan. (There is an easy joke to be made here pertaining to "relative status" of both the student and of Piers Morgan, but I'll skip it. I will, however, indulge my ego long enough to tell you that my use of the phrase "relative status" is itself a meta-joke. More on that in an intended future post.)

On the off-chance that you live under a bigger rock than I do, the video clip is sufficient for you to fill in the back-story yourself. This is not a complicated plot. But if you do happen to want the in-depth story, you can start here and work your way backwards.

Now, my initial reaction to this issue was that she was deflecting attention away from herself with a lot of red herring stuff about "rape culture" and betrayal. To this day, she faults the boy who "outed" her for betraying her trust, rather than herself for doing something in one kind of public sphere that she did not want known in another public sphere. (The idea that there is only one public sphere escapes her, I suppose.)

What I said was that it was a deflection. Someone else put it this way:
Crowdsourcing the superego means that as long as a few people say, “it’s not easy nowadays, I’d like to see that bitter old codger try to succeed in today’s world!” she gets off scot free. I’ve counted 11 such comments, and I’m not even trying. Guilt and shame evaporate.
That's entirely accurate, except for one minor detail: that quote appears in a criticism of a completely different event that occurred in November, 2012.

But if we want to keep in line with the Stationary Waves terminology (and really, this far invested in it, can we afford to diverge from the paradigm?) we'd call it shared guilt.

The cool thing about the internet is that if you lurk around in it long enough, you're bound to find people who think similarly about your favorite things. That's true of scorned pornography actresses, humiliated daughters, and, yes, even quasi-philosophical bloggers like myself.

...Well, c'mon. What other purpose does it serve to link to a bunch of eloquent people who agree with me, if not to do a little crowdsourcing of my own.?