2013-07-08

8W: Introduction

I love sports-specific training, and running in particular. Of course! But sometimes sports-specific training is a bad match for your fitness goals. One reason is obvious: if you don't have a basketball game coming up, then why work out like a basketball player? It's hard to keep yourself motivated for a sport that you're not actively involved in.

But there are plenty of other reasons why you might want to pursue general fitness rather than sports-specific training. If you have a special occasion coming up and want to look your best, overall fitness is the best way to go. If you have little interest in specific sports, but a keen interest in being healthy, then you might train for well-roundedness rather than specific achievement. If you have long and physically demanding travel commitment, such as a month on the road for work, you might prefer to get in excellent all-around shape to improve your endurance to travel.

It was one or several of these reasons that inspired a reader to come to me for advice on creating an eight-week training all-around regimen suitable for someone who is less interested in running than I am, but equally interested in fitness.

This two-month schedule of exercises, which I am unimaginatively calling "8W" for "eight weeks," should be appropriate for anyone who knows their way around a well-equipped gym, which is to say: it's not for beginners. There is a wealth of fitness information out there for beginners, and I encourage beginners to seek out that information and make use of it. At Stationary Waves, though, the question is not where to start but what to tackle next.

Over the next eight weeks, I will be providing a daily, intermediate-level workout. In total, these workouts comprise the eight-week exercise regimen I developed for a reader: now yours for free! The principles applied throughout this regimen reflect a dedication to variety, progression, ambition, and well-roundedness.

The obligatory disclaimer is as follows: I'm no physiologist. I'm a fitness hobbyist. I cannot appeal to a PhD in exercise science, but I can appeal to my 25 years of personal experimentation. The exercises provided in my program are stated in a general way, without specific references to amounts of weight, to accommodate a wide array of fitness levels. Use this program as a guideline or as a source of new ideas. If things start to hurt, take some rest and ask yourself if you might benefit more from a less ambitious set of workouts.

But above all, have fun. Today's workout will follow in a subsequent post.